Thursday, April 26, 2007

Bloody Hell!

By now I am sure you all have caught wind of this he-said-he-said story regarding the HOF sock. Mike and Mike in the Morning brought my attention to the story, and coined the phrase "he-said-he-said". Deadspin put their typical humorous spin on it, and Curt hasn't addressed it yet. Not sure if he will, my guess is he tries to ride this out (e.g. hopes the story goes away).

Personally, I think the story is a dead-end. It's interesting that Thorne called out Mirabelli by name, which certainly lends some credibility to his story and/or at least puts Mirabelli in the hot-seat. The team has circled the wagons and has presented a unified front, which leads me to believe the story will go no-where. As the Deadspin guys point out, are any of us surprised at the thought of Curt "self-aggrandizing"? No, not really. Should we have the HOF test the sock? I hope it doesn't get to that, but that certainly would put end to the story. I am not sure I can take another fake story right now.

8 comments:

  1. Gary Thorne is a dumbass. Mirabelli flat out denied it. Most players would have said they were joking. In fact, Mirabelli claims to not even know who Thorne is!

    Schilling basically had staples in his leg. The skin over it must have been stitched shut (take it from someone who has had surgery)...Those stitches will bleed if stretched.

    I am sure that Fox will look at the video of him pitching and be able to tell from pitch to pitch if the spot spread.

    This is a silly thing caused by someone saying a silly thing. We've talked tirelessly about how reporters say crap to make a name for themself...in this case, the guy is commenting on something that happened over 2 years ago and there isn't a way to prove he's wrong without testing the sock.

    He was probably trying to stir up trouble in the Red Sox locker room because he actually believes that his crappy Orioles team stand a chance at the division.

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  2. I am glad this has all come to a close. Apparently, Thorne while a respected broadcaster has made mistakes on air before. In this case, he read into Mirabelli's words too much.

    The NY Times got in with the act as well, quoting some former Red Sox.

    Yesterday, Mientkiewicz, now a Yankee, said he was certain of the blood’s provenance. “I saw him get cut open,” he said. “I know what he did for us and it was pretty much heroic. Schill likes attention. I don’t think he likes this much attention.”

    Johnny Damon, another 2004 teammate of Schilling’s, said, “As far as I know, it’s authentic.” Then, he smiled.


    Johnny Damon is an ass.

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  3. And now Schilling is offerring a $1MM to anyone that proves its fake. I think now the story will officially die.

    Either that or it will be like Lance and drugs - no proof, yet a story that will live forever....

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  4. Here is the link X is referring to above.

    I skimmed it mostly. A few things jump out at me. First off, Schilling is a bit shrill or to take a stab at being Peter N. "Scrhill". His language is abrasive and direct. And his reference to the "Lord" is a bit sanctimonious for me. All that being said I find Schrilling’s blog useful. Journalism, in particular sports journalism, has gone unchecked for too long. This is why there are blogs like CHB Watch and why Mnookin and others gets so amped about ChASS. There is way too much crap out there.

    Schrilling’s blog serves a useful purpose; to report a player’s side of the story. Mind you, this is not "the players’" side but "a player’s" side. To his credit Schrilling has claimed nothing more than such. It is refreshing, it is pioneering, and I wish more players did it. (Hell, wouldn’t we all love a Carl Everett blog too?). Why not provide the public with a direct insight to the game? Aren’t we all sick and tired of the fair-weather interpretations of talking-heads who fill the air-waves and newsprint with their pseudo-news? I certainly didn’t pick these guys to filter news for me. I wish more journalist policed each other. At this point, it’s a mark against the NY Times that someone hasn’t address Chass’s blatant stirring-up gossip. Some might argue that Chass is fulfilling a need to “entertain” his New York audience. However, as soon as we mix entertainment and journalism we may as well elect Jerry Springer for President. Schrilling in my mind is providing insight to the game. Yes, it helps promote him but I am changing my opinion; he’s not doing it because he wants more attention. He’s doing it because he’s passionate about baseball and he is passionate about expressing his ideas. His choice of vehicle for this expression is commendable and inspiring albeit shrill.

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  5. So, it's been shown to be false, and that's great. But am I really the only one that thinks it would have been awesome if it were true? I mean, that's the kind of fake-out legends are made of.

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